Featured Post: How to attract birds into your garden

Its a really good idea to try to give children as many opportunities as possible to interact with wildlife. This is important for their mental well-being, to enable them to appreciate and gain an understanding of the environment and also simply to learn about different types of birds. We love to experiment making bird feeders and wildlife friendly things for the garden.

In terms of feeding birds we have a bit of a hit and miss relationship in our household. I must admit that we don’t really want to attract lots of pigeons and we have to be careful about attracting the ‘tamer’ birds like Robins as our cat is a fearsome predator.

I’ve been given some top tips on  how to attract three specific types of birds in to your garden.


Dunnocks are small and inconspicuous birds that reside in gardens across the UK with a preference for staying close to the edge of flower beds, bushes and hedges. They’re renowned for their shuffling, almost nervous gait, preferring to creep along the edge of vegetation rather than be out in the open.

Food for dunnocks: As well as eating worms, spiders and insects, dunnocks will be grateful for seeds provided in bird feeders – especially in the winter when food on the ground is more scarce. It’s worth remembering, however, that they do prefer dense cover when they’re eating.

So, if you want to attract them into your garden, make sure you position your bird feeder on the fringe of a thick hedgerow or close to a patch of vegetation. Dunnocks will eat fine seeds such as millet, and will be likely to visit your garden if you provide them with crushed or grated nuts.


Greenfinches are frequently spotted all over Britain – in country gardens and urban gardens, in farmland and in parks. As they’re often found close to woodland and hedges, the only place you likely won’t see them is in an upland area without trees or bushes.

Food for greenfinches: Greenfinches will eat bird seed and insects. They’re not fussy, but they do particularly like peanuts and black-oil sunflower seeds. During the winter, they’ll happily take whole nuts and seeds from your bird feeder to bulk out their diet, but watch out – they’re sociable and will squabble with other birds at the feeder if there’s something they want!

Just be sure to avoid any seed mixtures that contain dried rice or dried beans – only larger species can eat this kind of seed, and therefore it isn’t suitable for a bird the size of a greenfinch.


Goldfinches are beautifully coloured birds with a bright red face and a patch of yellow on their wings. You’ll find them all over Britain, except for in the far north and west of Scotland. Their highest numbers are generally recorded in the south of England.

Food for goldfinches: In the summer, goldfinches will eat insects and seeds, but in the winter they’ll rely on your bird feeder to help support them through the colder months. Goldfinches will eat most types of seed, although they’re very partial to small, black nyjer seeds. The high oil content of this food makes it attractive to goldfinches, but bear in mind that you will need a special type of bird feeder if you want to supply it. Nyjer is a very small seed and will need a dispenser that is capable of administering the right portion sizes.

If you’re looking for more information then there are lots of resources on line including the RSPB (of which we are members) website which has lots of fab information.


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