Featured Post: Why vintage diamonds are worth the high price tag

One of my interests in my day job as a museum curator is costume. I spend a long time looking at dress and jewellery and I’ve really enjoyed including costume in various exhibitions. From suffragette jewellery in an exhibition about the Edwardians through to beautiful Ancient Egyptian inspired jewellery in an Ancient Egypt exhibition. 

A friend of mine collects vintage jewellery and is always telling me about the amazing finds she makes. Until fairly recently I was astonished to find out how much cheaper it is than new jewellery. Its actually well worthwhile buying a piece just for the diamonds which you can then have made into an item of your choice. I’ve been sent some information about vintage diamonds which I thought was of interest, because, you know, Christmas is coming and its not all about stuff for the kids is it!

 

Vintage diamonds are worth the price tag because they were not mass produced when first designed and made and the cuts are unusual compared to modern diamond cutting techniques. Vintage diamonds were generally cut by hand, which means no stone is the same and offers a uniqueness to a piece of jewellery that you will not find anywhere else.

However, these irregular shaped diamonds were once rejected or downgraded by specialists but are now revered and used as a symbol of authenticity when it comes to vintage stones. They allow us to hold on to a little piece of history in the form of something beautiful we can adorn ourselves with or have on display.

Vintage diamonds are also worth the price tag because they come with a story. In the 1900s wealthy families would travel and collect diamonds from countries they visited, which they would then have made into stunning pieces of jewellery to show off at extravagant parties. These pieces are then handed down throughout the generations, gaining in value and exhibiting a variety of cutting styles as methods were adapted and refined over time.

Diamonds owned by a famous person for a long time are also very popular. Elizabeth Taylor’s diamond jewellery was sold for an incredible $137 million at an auction in 2012 while a ring supposedly owned by child star Shirley Temple was auctioned for between $25 million and $35 million but failed to sell.

Lab grown diamonds are more common than ever now in the diamond jewellery market and their presence could be encouraging a push towards authentic diamonds as buyers wish to hold onto the craftsmanship that went into their creation. It’s safe to say, vintage diamonds will continue to attract investors, gain value as the years go on and will be put up for auctions over time where the highest bidder will take home a slice of history to share with others and hand down to future generations.

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